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Britons to Shine Light from Window to Celebrate 200th Birthday of Nightingale - News - Nursesarena Forum

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Britons to Shine Light from Window to Celebrate 200th Birthday of Nightingale by katty : May 10, 2020, 05:28:28 AM
*Tuesday is International Nurses Day and 200th anniversary of Nightingale's birth
*Public urged to take to windows with a lamp in recognition of nurses on Tuesday
*The symbolic gesture this week is a nod to the lamp carried by Nightingale

People are being encouraged to shine a light from their windows in recognition of the role of nurses in the coronavirus fight, which has been described as the 'greatest health emergency in NHS history'.

The symbolic gesture this week will be a nod to the lamp which Florence Nightingale - a founder of modern nursing - was known to carry.

Tuesday marks both International Nurses Day and the 200th anniversary of Nightingale's birth.

The famous nurse's image and a message of thanks will be projected from Parliament on to her place of work, St Thomas's Hospital, while similar projections will happen at the British Embassy in Rome and the Italian Federation of Nurses.

Thousands of former nurses have come out of retirement to help the health service deal with the coronavirus outbreak and thousands of students are also helping by working in extended clinical placements.



England's chief nursing officer Ruth May said public support shown so far has 'buoyed' colleagues during what she said is a testing time, and she urged people to once again show their gratitude by shining a light from their homes at 8.30pm on Tuesday.

She said: 'International Day of the Nurse is particularly special this year not just because we mark the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale's birth, but because of the extraordinary work all those who have followed in her footsteps are doing in the fight against coronavirus.

'I want to thank each and every one of our incredible nurses who are on the frontline in the battle against the greatest health emergency in NHS history.

'Their professionalism and skills are helping to save and rebuild countless lives.'

Professor Greta Westwood, CEO of the Florence Nightingale Foundation, said: 'Florence Nightingale, herself a trailblazer during her career, would have been proud at the way nurses have followed in her footsteps as pioneers and leaders in the fight against the pandemic.

'They are truly her legacy today.'

The year 2020 has been made International Year of the Nurse to mark the bicentenary of Nightingale's birth.

How Florence Nightingale became a hero known as the Lady with the Lamp after treating patients during the Crimean War

Florence Nightingale was born in 1820 in the Italian city of Florence and moved with her family as a baby to the East Midlands in 1821.

The Nightingale family was wealthy and well-connected and Florence’s father William Shore had inherited the Lea estate (and with it the right to change his surname) from his uncle, Peter Nightingale.

Her mother, Frances 'Fanny' Smith was the sister of Benjamin Leigh Smith who was an outspoken critic of the slave trade.

Benjamin had a son of the same name who became a famed Arctic explorer on board the Eira.


On their return to England the family built Lea Hurst, a 15-bedroom family home in Derbyshire, where they lived until 1825.

Lea Hurst, located in Holloway, Matlock, remained the family’s summer home and Nightingale returned there consistently throughout her life.

She is known as the founder of modern nursing and a profoundly talented statistician and advocate of social reform.

After tending to soldiers during the Crimean War from 1854 she soon garnered a reputation for professional excellence and was known as the 'lady with the lamp' due to her continued observations of the wounded and ill overnight.

Nightingale highlighted issues surrounding hygiene and living conditions for soldiers, noting that far more were dying of infection or illnesses such as typhoid and dysentery than their battle wounds.

She implemented hand washing practices and called for the British government to help improve sanitation. The sanitary commission cleaned out sewers and improved ventilation, drastically reducing the death rate at scutari hospital in Istanbul.

Florence Nightingale played a key role in the 1860s in advising on the redesign and management of the biggest hospital in the area, the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, which opened in 1869 with a wing named in her honour.

The hospital remained the primary hospital in the city of Derby until the opening of the Royal Derby in 2010.

Demolition works began in 2010 on most of the building with plans for only the the two iconic 'pepper pot' towers to remain.

A statue of Florence Nightingale survives outside the hospital's site to this day after being first unveiled in 1924, 14 years after her death at the age of 90.

She helped found the first secular nursing school in the world and her name is synonymous with nursing of the highest standard.

The Nightingale Pledge is now taken by new nurses, and the Florence Nightingale Medal and is the highest international distinction a nurse can achieve.

International Nurses Day is celebrated around the world on her birthday.

Source: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8304247/amp/Britons-urged-shine-light-windows-Tuesday-tribute-nurses-coronavirus-frontline.html

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