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* News / Libya to recruit 150 Filipino first phase nurses for Tripoli University Hospital by katty: Today at 06:18:16 PM
Libya has agreed to the recruitment of 150 Filipino auxiliary nurses for Tripoli University Hospital (TUH). The revelation was made after the meeting of the Philippine Consul in Libya, Merdumel Selo Malkor, with the Director of TUH Dr Nabil Alageli in Tripoli yesterday.

During the meeting, which focused on the details and logistics of how to facilitate Filipino medical personnel to work in the hospital, Alageli praised the professionalism and contribution of Filipino medical personnel in supporting the Libyan health sector over the past years. He also highlighted the vacuum they had left after returning to the Philippines, which led to the low level of medical services in the hospital.

It was agreed that 150 auxiliary medical staff would be dispatched as an urgent first phase to fill the shortfall in some vital sections of the TUH and to coordinate other teams to train nurses in the hospital and the Libyan Nursing College.

Alageli added that the return of Filipino medical personnel to work at the TUH would be the beginning of a return of Filipino (and other foreign) medical personnel to all health facilities in Libya.

TUH currently has less than 100 Filipino auxiliary medical personnel, and to fill the current deficit in all departments the TUH needs more than 800.

In a related context, Alageli announced the commissioning and dispatching of a committee to procure medical assistance from India and Bangladesh to fill the nursing shortage in TUH.

It will be recalled that in May this year the Faiez Serraj-led Presidency Council (PC) had granted approval for TUH to recruit foreign nurses.

Speaking directly to Libya Herald at the time of writing, Alageli had said that the nurses would be recruited from the Philippines, India and Bangladesh. A committee was to be sent to the three countries to interview candidates and then a private firm would take over the process, organizing travel, accommodation and security, he explained.

With regards to the vexing issue of payment in hard currency to the nurses, Alageli had said that the PC Ministry of Labour had contacted the Tripoli-based Central Bank of Libya requesting that the nurses be allowed to transfer 100 percent of their salaries in hard currency – as opposed to the existing 70 percent limit.

The plan to recruit foreign nurses to the TUH comes as part of a wider effort by the Serraj PC to reform the Libyan health sector. It will be recalled that in April this year the PC passed a decree reorganizing and converting Tripoli Medical Centre (TMC) into a university hospital. And in March it published a decree renaming the TMC as Tripoli University Hospital (TUH).

These moves by the Serraj-led PC come as part of its wider healthcare reform  efforts under its National Committee for Health Strategy Reform (NCHSR) launched last October.

In the beginning of March the PC appointed Alageli as the new director for the then TMC. Alageli had also signed a new maintenance contract with Austrian company Vamed for the TMC at the end of March.
Source: https://www.libyaherald.com/2018/08/14/libya-to-recruit-150-filipino-first-phase-nurses-for-tripoli-university-hospital/
* Articles / Women dominate nursing. So why do men still make this much more than them? by katty: Today at 06:15:32 PM
Women have always vastly outnumbered men in the nursing profession -- by a lot. In fact, today, they make up nearly 90 percent of the industry's U.S. workforce. So it begs the question: Why do their male counterparts still make so much more than them?

A recent survey of more than 4,500 registered nurses from all 50 states found that male nurses earn an average of $79,688 a year compared to $73,090 for women -- a nearly $6,600 pay gap, according to Nurse.com by OnCourse Learning, an online educational resource for nurses throughout the world, which conducted the study.

According to the survey, the wage gap may boil down to the negotiation factor -- that men are "more likely to negotiate their salaries" than women. The survey found that while 43 percent of men "most of the time or always negotiate," only 34 percent of women do so. Research has found this to be the case in professions across the U.S.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, full-time, year-round working women in 2016 earned just 80 percent of what their male counterparts earned, which is similar for full-time working women in New Jersey, who women earned 81 percent of their male counterparts, according to the nonprofit American Association of University Women.

While the overall gender wage gap in the U.S. has narrowed since the 1980s, particularly for women 25 to 34, it nonetheless remains a pervasive issue in professions nationwide, according to a report by Pew Research earlier this year.

And while the Nurse.com survey found that the wage disparity in the U.S. nursing profession is slightly better than the overall national gender pay gap, it nonetheless serves as a daunting example in an industry overwhelmingly made up of women.

There were more than 80,000 registered nurses in New Jersey in 2017, according to the U.S. Department of Labor Statistics, earning a median salary of $82,010 a year. New Jersey also ranks third for states most in need of registered nurses.

Judith Schmidt, CEO of the New Jersey State Nurses Association (NJSA), an organization that advocates for the registered nurses in the state, told NJ Advance Media that she was not surprised by the survey's findings.

"Entry level salaries are basically the same. However, more men (around 7 to 10 percent of total nursing workforce) go into the higher salaried areas such as administration and entrepreneurial positions," she said via email. "Female nurses are staying in direct patient care and bedside."

Dr. Benjamin Evans, president of the New Jersey State Nurses Association, told NJ Advance Media in an email that, in his view, male nurses have tended to seek out more opportunities to advance their education and careers, whereas female nurses have often used the profession as "supplemental support for their families."

He also said that often nurses are often at a disadvantage when it comes to their pay.

"Salaries and money flow are often set between non-nurse health care administrators, finance officers and human relations officers," he said. "Nursing's true cost and revenue has not been vetted well. Frequently, nursing care is lumped in with the daily bed rate in a hospital."

Millicent Gorham, executive director of the National Black Nurses Association, said in the statement from Nurse.com that "women need to learn to negotiate for everything."

Susan C. Reinhard, senior vice president and director of AARP's Public Policy Institute and chief strategist at the Center to Champion Nursing in America, also noted in that statement that research has also linked higher degrees with "more career choices that can lead to better paying jobs."

In fact, professional certifications, the statement said, is one avenue female nurses can use to narrow the salary gap. According to the survey, men with specialty certifications had a salary of only about $1,250 higher than their female counterparts.

Brent MacWilliams, president of the American Association for Men in Nursing, said in the statement that "traditionally, men have gravitated toward acute care, high-paid specialties and to management/administration, which are all higher paying" and that based on the survey, "it seems clear men are being paid significantly more than women in the profession doing comparable work."

"I would call on employers to assess their current workforce for gender gaps and raise salaries to create parity," he added.

Spencer Kent may be reached at skent@njadvancemedia.com.
Source: https://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2018/08/women_nursing_industry_men_pay_gap_salaries_survey.html
* Nursing Jobs / Paediatric Nurses - Dubai by Subheksha Ratola: Today at 11:28:53 AM
We have an incredible opportunity to join the first ever dedicated Paediatric hospital in Dubai!
 
This is the first dedicated Paediatric Hospital in the whole of the United Arab Emirates!
This is an ultramodern Hospital boasting positivity and welcoming staff from round the world.
 
We are on the lookout for multiple Paediatric Registered Nurses, Paediatric Charge Nurses and Paediatric Senior Staff Nurses with recent experience.
 
Opportunities in the following departments;
 
Critical Care – CICU/PICU/NICU
General Ward – Inpatient
OPD Ward – Outpatient
Oncology
Orthopaedics
Neurology
Otolaryngology
Renal Transplant
Emergency
OT
Wound care
Mental Health
 
This hospital is offering attractive salary and benefits packages.
 
They will also take care of your visa and registration for a painless relocation!
 
United Arab Emirates; Dubai
Dubai is a city and emirate in the United Arab Emirates known for luxury shopping, ultramodern architecture and a lively nightlife scene. It is home to a large amount of things to see and do, such as The Burj Khalifa  a 830m-tall tower that dominates the skyscraper-filled skyline! At its foot lies Dubai Fountain, with jets and lights choreographed to music. On artificial islands just offshore is Atlantis,
 
Dubai also has a massive expat community and attracts hundreds and thousands of tourist a year!
 
 
Essential qualifications and skills:
Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing
Registered Nurse with valid professional Nursing license for country of origin
Minimum of 2+ years of recent experience in a Hospital based in Western Europe, Central America, South Africa and Australasia
Proficiency with Microsoft Office suite
Fluency in written and spoken English
 
Benefits:
100% Tax Free Income
Health Insurance for self  (and family depending on grades)
To & Fro Flight Tickets to home Country for self (and family depending on grades)
15 Days CNE & Training leaves
Subsidized Meals at Hospitals
48 Hours Working per week
30 days accommodation at the time of joining

Contact Subheksha.ratola@medacs.com or
call +44 203 198 9050
 
* Nursing Jobs / Director of Nursing by Subheksha Ratola: Today at 09:38:49 AM
We are urgently looking for 3 Director of Nursing for our client in Saudi Arabia – Dr Sulaiman Al Habib. They have 3 positions available, two in Riyadh and one in Al Khobar.
 
Your sourcing target must follow the below criteria:
 
• candidate must be female Western.
• Age of 40 - 55 years old.
• Working as Director of Nursing (Chief of Nursing) for the last 5 years in general tertiary well known hospitals.
• Responsible for nursing department on daily operation and managing at least 200 nursing staff.
• Nursing experience without gap.
 
I have attached for you the JD of Director of nursing.
* Nursing Jobs / Job opportuity in UK for Registered Nurses by Sunil Bhavnani: August 13, 2018, 03:34:12 PM
Excellent opportunity to advance Nursing career in UK !!!

Hurry up IELTS / OET ready nurses, garb the opportunity .

Minimum Requirement :-
*1 year of hospital experience
*IELTS/ OET / CBT

The Trust is offering a generous relocation package including:
*flights to the U.K.,
*accommodation for 2 months,
*fund for OSCE
*Visa costs,
*Reimbursement of IELTS and CBT
*excellent opportunities for growth and career development.

If interested please revert back on
karen.dsouza@medacs.com or can call on
+442031989054
* Nursing Jobs / Paediatric Nurses- Dubai by Sunil Bhavnani: August 13, 2018, 12:18:40 PM
We have an incredible opportunity to join the first ever dedicated Paediatric hospital in Dubai!
 
This is the first dedicated Paediatric Hospital in the whole of the United Arab Emirates!
This is an ultramodern Hospital boasting positivity and welcoming staff from round the world.
 
We are on the lookout for multiple Paediatric Registered Nurses, Paediatric Charge Nurses and Paediatric Senior Staff Nurses with recent experience.
 
Opportunities in the following departments;
 
•   Critical Care – CICU/PICU/NICU
•   General Ward – Inpatient
•   OPD Ward – Outpatient
•   Oncology
•   Orthopaedics
•   Neurology
•   Otolaryngology
•   Renal Transplant
•   Emergency
•   OT
•   Wound care
•   Mental Health
 
This hospital is offering attractive salary and benefits packages.
 
They will also take care of your visa and registration for a painless relocation!
 
United Arab Emirates; Dubai
Dubai is a city and emirate in the United Arab Emirates known for luxury shopping, ultramodern architecture and a lively nightlife scene. It is home to a large amount of things to see and do, such as The Burj Khalifa  a 830m-tall tower that dominates the skyscraper-filled skyline! At its foot lies Dubai Fountain, with jets and lights choreographed to music. On artificial islands just offshore is Atlantis,
 
Dubai also has a massive expat community and attracts hundreds and thousands of tourist a year!
 
 
Essential qualifications and skills:
•   Bachelor’s Degree in Nursing
•   Registered Nurse with valid professional Nursing license for country of origin
•   Minimum of 2+ years of recent experience in a Hospital based in Western Europe, Central America, South Africa and Australasia
•   Proficiency with Microsoft Office suite
•   Fluency in written and spoken English
 
Benefits:
•   100% Tax Free Income
•   Health Insurance for self  (and family depending on grades)
•   To & Fro Flight Tickets to home Country for self (and family depending on grades)
•   15 Days CNE & Training leaves

 
To register your interest and secure an interview, please contact Subheksha, at subheksha.ratola@medacs.com
* News / Well-Being Foundation Africa, others in race to reduce maternal,infant mortality by katty: August 13, 2018, 05:46:41 AM
THE Wellbeing Foundation Africa, WBFA, Johnson and Johnson and Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine are set to collaborate in providing healthcare facilities for the improvement of health outcomes for mothers and newborns in Kwara State.


 
The partnership which is expected to focus on  Emergency Obstetrics and Newborn Care, EmONC, would resonate across the state.

Founder of WBFA, Mrs. Toyin Ojora Saraki, said the project, which had been implemented in seven Local Government Areas, resulted in a 15 percent reduction in the maternal fatality rate.

In addition, a 38-percent reduction in the rate of stillbirth is expected in healthcare facilities across the remaining 16 LGAs where the project would further be implemented.

According to her: “The partnership, which focuses on Emergency Obstetrics and Newborn Care (EmONC) training in healthcare will now cover all 16 LGAs and consolidate the work in the areas in which the training is already active. This follows the successful completion of the first two phases of the partnership, which have been hailed as transforming the capacity of healthcare workers and their ability to save lives during labour.

“Partnerships like ours are so important because of the huge improvements that can readily be made. 80 percent of all maternal deaths result from five complications which can be readily treated by qualified and trained health professionals. They include hemorrhage, sepsis, eclampsia, complications of abortion and obstructed labour.

“Our EmONC training is so successful because it takes place in-house and equips doctors, nurses, and midwives, as a collective team, with the skills needed to overcome these obstetric emergencies.

“We will build on the lessons we have learned from our partnership to improve outcomes across all LGAs in Kwara State. I look forward to working together with our esteemed partners, local champions and health workers, to continue to save lives and help mothers, newborns and communities thrive.”

On her part, Country Manager of Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies in Nigeria, Michelle Akande, said:   “We believe, in partnerships, we can achieve so much more than what we can achieve alone.   Because of partners such as Wellbeing Foundation Africa and the Centre for Maternal and Newborn Health at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, we believe we can achieve the aspiration of ending preventable maternal and child death. However, we need each and every one of you to join us because it is our collective dedication and commitment that will make this aspiration a reality.”

A Senior Clinical Lecturer, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, LSTM, Dr. Charles Ameh,   said: “What is particularly exciting about phase three of this programme is the ability to be able to improve the availability and quality of emergency obstetric and newborn care across the entire state. The continued partnership with Johnson & Johnson, Wellbeing Foundation Africa and the Ministry of Health in Kwara State will not only allow LSTM to build the capacity of health care workers in LGAs where we have not worked before, but we will be consolidating the achievements of previous phases to ensure sustainability of the intervention.”

The WBFA has been known to take up interventions in areas of healthcare delivery, especially as it affects women and new borns.   The Foundation has also carried out philantrophic activities through its timely  support for and assistance given to some less priviledged who have had life-threatening injuries.
Source: Vanguard Newspaper
* News / Fake News: Filipino Nurse Denies Being Raped in Saudi Arabia by katty: August 12, 2018, 07:44:14 PM
A Filipino nurse has become the subject of actual, no doubt about it, 100% fake news after a website falsely reported that he was raped in Saudi Arabia. The nurse, named John Paul “Jap” Nofuente, posted on Facebook on Saturday to debunk the online report.

Nofuente wrote on his Facebook post: “Please don’t believe everything you read on social media. Kindly report the article if it appears on your timeline. Thank you.”



He added a screenshot of the false report, which had this sensationalized headline in Filipino: “Handsome Pinoy nurse in Saudi, raped by five Arabs, a bottle of Coke was inserted into his butt, [now in] critical [condition]!”

The screenshot included an image of a bandaged person on a hospital bed, an image of a smiling Nofuente, and what looks like a small bottle of Coca-Cola.

The photoshop job also included a logo of local media company ABS-CBN, to make it appear that the news appeared in one of its television programs.

One of Nofuente’s followers shared a screenshot of the same article shared in a Facebook group.
AFP Philippines has debunked the false news and shared several links on sites where the story was shared.

Visited today, the websites only have titles saying the nurse had passed away (he hasn’t). The video that accompanies the title can no longer be found.

Turns out the photo of the bandaged patient on a hospital bed was stolen from a crowdfunding website. He turned out to be Aljun Andrade, an overseas Filipino worker in Riyadh who was severely beaten up.

Nofuente told AFP that while he is indeed a nurse, he has never worked in Saudi Arabia.

AFP said that such clickbait reports are used to lure netizens to answer surveys that lead to online advertisements.

source : https://uk.news.yahoo.com/tale-fake-news-nurse-denies-062035247.html
* News / How Media Influences Image of Nursing, Midwifery Careers by katty: August 12, 2018, 07:21:40 PM
...but nurses do much more than physicians, who, unfortunately, get credit for all the meaningful work done.

Public health research shows that the media affects how the public think about nurses and nursing as a profession.

Many health reports in print and electronic media relegate the views of nurses to general experiences while expert opinions are reserved for physicians.

This has, over time, influenced misconceptions and stereotypes of nurses.

One stereotype that is especially damaging to the profession is that the role of a nurse is to fetch things for physicians, especially during surgical procedures.

But nurses do much more than physicians, who, unfortunately, get credit for all the meaningful work done.

SETBACKS

Another is that nurses are uneducated and cannot make rational decisions on the welfare of patients without consulting physicians.

If nurses did not double-check and question physicians’ diagnoses and treatment, that would be malpractice.

Nurses usually have a better idea of a patient’s doing; their job is to protect the patient.

The third is of a self-sacrificing angel of mercy who does not mind being overworked and underpaid.

That explains why cases of industrial action by nurses have increased, especially in developing countries.

Another setback of this stereotype is the massive brain drain of developed countries in search of better life.

SOLUTION

Then, of course, is the negative female sexuality stereotype that depicts nurses as sex objects.

Research shows that nurses suffer an inordinate amount of sexual and other abuse at work.

These stereotypes persist as they are largely accepted in many media platforms and have been identified as among factors that inhibit the ability of nurses to provide quality patient care.

What can nurses do about it?

There is the widely accepted thinking that it’s better for nurses to keep their mouths closed — which may have evolved from the fact that the first nurses were nuns.

Even while working, nurses rarely speak about what they are doing and what they observe.
.
ADVOCATES

It is hard for people to learn about nursing through ‘collective closed-mouth policy’. Nurses need to be advocates of the profession.

They need to initiate partnership with the media since there are many of them who can be resources for journalists, bloggers and editors.

Nurses need to embrace communication technology, including social media, to sensitise the public on what they do including highlighting their success stories.

Many nurses are going out of their way to improve the morbidity and mortality statistics in their regions by initiating innovative community health projects but these efforts are neither recognised nor appreciated.

Finally, nurses need to pursue other avenues of conflict resolution, especially on their welfare, other than constantly resorting to industrial action as that fuels their negative image.

SOSPETER NDABA KIMANI is a programme manager at Aga Khan Development Network.
* News / New Jersey Nurse Turns 99 in November, Has no Plan to Retire Soon by katty: August 11, 2018, 11:56:06 AM
-She has been practicing for 77 years.

On the second Thursday of every month, the Emerson Senior Club gathers together for meetings, dance classes and other activities. They also usually get their blood pressure checked, and the nurse on call is 98 years old.

Kathryn “Kay” Hodges is reportedly the oldest active nurse practitioner in the state. She’s been certified for 77 years, and has worked in Emerson for more than five decades. She’s been practicing so long that she started seeing some of her senior citizen patients when they were babies.



“Their children or grandchildren [now] come,” said Hodges. “It’s a nice family connection.”

She works every Thursday, checking blood pressure and reading medications. Hodges also attends monthly county meetings, but her job responsibilities don’t tell the full story.

“Kay has never taken a sick day while working for the Borough of Emerson,” said Robert Hoffmann, Borough Administrator. “She’s like the post office motto: Neither rain nor snow nor gloom of night can keep Kay from her appointed rounds."

Hodges says her best days are when she finds something troubling while checking a patient’s blood pressure. She will then encourage them go to a doctor for a checkup.

Though she just stopped driving this past spring, she has no plans of slowing down.

“I’ll let the good Lord take care of that,” Hodges responds when asked about retirement. “I like what I am doing, and as long as I can do it and do what I’m supposed to, and they have no objections, I will stay.”

The beloved nurse turns 99 on Nov. 1.
Source : https://pix11.com/2018/08/10/meet-njs-98-year-old-nurse-the-states-oldest-who-has-no-plans-to-retire/
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