Author Topic: Holly Whyte who stole nurse's identity sentenced to prison  (Read 1282 times)

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Idowu Olabode

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An Indiana woman has been sentenced to two and half years in prison for stealing another nurse’s identity and making false statements related to health care matters.

Holly Whyde made no direct apology or statement in court but answered questions presented by her attorney.



When asked if she was ready to go to prison to pay for what she did, Whyde replied: “Yes.”

When asked by her attorney if she did a horrible thing, she said: “Yes.”

Prosecutors argued that Whyde “focused her life on crime” and concocted a scheme in which she stole the nursing license of a registered nurse and used it to obtain a high-paying job as the director of nursing at a Columbus, Ind. rehabilitation facility where she earned more than $100,000 annually.

Prosecutors argued that Whyde devised this scheme to hide her criminal history that would have made it difficult for her attain such a high-paying lucrative job. Whyde did in fact apply for and legitimately receive a license practical nursing license.

U.S. Asst. Attorney Cindy Cho read portions of Whyde’s criminal history in court, which included arrests on theft and fraud charges in Marion, Johnson and Shelby counties dating back to the time Whyde was 16.

Now, 45 years old, Whyde told the judge that she takes medications for mental health treatment but understood the plea agreement she was agreeing to.

Under the terms, Whyde will spend the next 30 months in federal prison and be required to be under supervised release for two years after her prison term is up.

Prosecutors also allege that Whyde shared the same first and middle name as her victim, Holly Marie Aumick, and used that to her advantage by accessing the state’s professional licensing system online, changing Aumick’s personal information – including her address.

Whyde then used that information to contact Aumick’s college, Governor’s State University in Illinois, where she obtained a copy of Aumick’s college transcript. Prosecutors argue Whyde then used that information to her advantage, helping her secure a high-paying position she could not have earned with her qualifications as a licensed practical nurse.

Neither Whyde’s criminal past nor her illegal use of the state’s licensing system appear to have detected by the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency or the Board of Nursing.

An I-Team 8 investigation last month uncovered how easily nursing licenses can be manipulated. At the time, a spokesman for IPLA said he could not provide any information about Holly Whyde and noted that there were no pending policy changes regarding license renewals.

When nurses renew their licenses every two years, they are required to fill out a form asking if they’ve faced discipline or arrest since the last time they renewed. If a nurse answers “yes” to any of those questions, it came sometimes result in an appearance before the board.

In their most recent filing, prosecutors argued that Whyde impacted two lives in her alleged scheme by slightly altering Aumick’s social security number, she unwittingly affected the social security number of a cosmetologist in Tennessee, who possessed the actual number Whyde was using.

Whyde’s husband left court and declined to speak to a reporter.

Source : Wish Tv